Where the Rivers Flow North & Howard Frank Mosher Tribute Tour

Vermont filmmaker Jay Craven is hitting the road this fall for an extended series of film screenings and personal reflections to pay tribute to his 30-year collaborator, Northeast Kingdom writer, Howard Frank Mosher. Craven will screen his film Where the Rivers Flow North and present reflections on his work with Mosher at the Billings Farm & Museum on Sunday, November 12 at 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. Admission is by contribution to the Hurricane Maria Relief Fund. 

“After a successful summer tour, we’re extending our tribute events into the fall,” said Craven. “Howard Mosher died pretty unexpectedly in late January. And many Vermonters already miss him for his laugh-out-loud humor and fertile imagination of our place.  Writers miss him, too, because no one was more generous with his time and support.”

Craven will open the evening with prepared and off-the-cuff reflections that explore his long collaboration with Mosher. He will then present a 25th Anniversary screening of his first Mosher feature film, Where the Rivers Flow North, starring Academy Award® nominee Rip Torn, Native American actress Tantoo Cardinal (Dances with Wolves, Legends of the Fall), and Michael J. Fox.

“Howard was much more than a source for our film stories and characters,” said Craven. “He was also a constant ally, a ready source of laughs, and a steadying influence in times of strain. This was especially crucial during our struggles with headstrong actor Rip Torn on the filming of “Rivers.” I will tell a few tales that have not been publically shared before—because they capture a rarely seen side of Howard and his work.”

Set in 1927 in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, “Where the Rivers Flow North” tells the story of an old logger, Noel Lord, and his Native American mate, Bangor, who face the extinction of their way of life when the local power company plans to build a giant hydro dam that will flood them off their land. Lord and Bangor face emotional and physical challenges as they struggle with the power company, Vermont’s unforgiving terrain, and their own thorny relationship.

Where the Rivers Flow North played more than 30 festival dates including Sundance, Seattle, Avignon, Vienna, and Vancouver. The picture was also one of three U.S. finalists for Cannes International Film Festival’s Critics Week.

Admission to the screening of Where the Rivers Flow North and the Howard Frank Mosher Tribute Tour is by contribution to the Hurricane Maria Relief Fund. Reservations are strongly suggested:  802-457-2355 or www.billingsfarm.org.

The Mosher Tribute tour is produced by Hotel Vermont and Kingdom County Productions with sponsorship support from Vermont Public Radio.

2017 People’s Choice Quilt Awards Announced

Billings Farm & Museum, gateway to Vermont’s rural heritage, announces the results of the 2017 “People’s Choice” awards for the 31st Annual Quilt Exhibition, held July 29–September 17, 2017.

Over 15,000 visitors viewed the exhibition and nearly 1,000 ballots were cast for favorite quilts. The results: Full size quilts:  First place: Logs in Black & White – Sandra S. Palmer, Hartland; Second Place: Milk Hill, 12 August, 2001 – Joanne Shapp, North Pomfret; Third Place: Eye of the Storm in 3-D – Mary Croft, East Barnard. Small/Medium size quilts: First: Ella’s Garden– Carie Good, Woodstock; Second: Coming and Going – Lynne Croswell, Ludlow; Third: (Election Year) Star Spangled Banner – Sonya Stover, Woodstock.

At the exhibition opening, the Jurors’Choice Awards were presented to: Mary Guntz of Hartford for Indian Summer’s Flying Geese, by juror Colleen O’Neil; Star Spangled Banner, made by Sonya Stover of Woodstock, selected by juror Nola Forbes; Joanne Shapp of North Pomfret, selected by juror Kathie Beltz for Milk Hill, 12 August, 2001. The Billings Farm & Museum Staff Choice was awarded to Mary Croft of East Barnard, for her quilt Eye of the Storm.

 

Logs in Black & White by Sandra Palmer, Hartland, VT
Milk Hill, 12 August, 2001 by Joanne Shapp, North Pomfret, VT
Eye of the Storm in 3-D by Mary Croft, East Barnard, VT
Ella’s Garden by Carie Good, Woodstock, VT
Coming and Going by Lynne Croswell, Ludlow, VT
(Election Year) Star Spangled Banner by Sonya Stover, Woodstock, VT

Wassail Weekend Activities Featured at Billings Farm & Museum

WOODSTOCK, VERMONT. Billings Farm & Museum, gateway to Vermont’s rural heritage, will open for Wassail Weekend, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, December 9, 10, and 11, from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Farm will feature historic Christmas ornaments – to make and take home. Don’t miss the authentically decorated farm house, visits to the dairy farm for interactive programs, holiday activities, plus the Academy Award® nominee film, A Place in the Land. Also on Sunday: 10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. horse-drawn sleigh or wagon rides, depending on the weather.

The Billings Farm & Museum is owned and operated by The Woodstock Foundation, Inc., a charitable non-profit institution.

Please call 802-457- 2355 for daily activities and programs and a list of seasonal events or view them online.

Contact:
Tom Remp
tremp@billingsfarm.org
802-457-2355.

Christmas at the Farm Featured at Billings Farm & Museum

WOODSTOCK, VERMONT… Discover the traditions of a late 19th century Vermont Christmas with a visit to the Billings Farm & Museum this holiday season. Christmas at the Billings Farm will be featured on weekends in December and December 24 – January 1, 2016, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. (excluding Christmas Day). Tour the authentically decorated farmhouse, visit the dairy farm for interactive programs including An Introduction to Milking and Milking the Herd at 3:15 p.m. each day, holiday activities, plus the Academy Award® nominee film, A Place in the Land will be offered.

Like most New England states, Vermont did not widely celebrate Christmas until late in the 19th century. It was not until 1890, when the farmhouse at the Billings Farm was completed, that Christmas became recognized as a holiday in all states. At that time, celebrations were much simpler than they would become in the 20th century and certainly today. Families enjoyed the holiday, but still had cows to milk, ice to cut, and wood to saw. A few gifts, a special meal, and the gathering of friends, were noteworthy in an otherwise typical day.

Decorations of the period included fresh greens draped over mantels, windows, and staircases throughout the house. Small trees, packed in a jar or butter tub and placed on a tabletop were common. Many of the ornaments reflected an agricultural tradition, including strands of cranberries, popcorn, or dried apples that circled the tree. Apples studded with cloves, “exotic” oranges, silvered (foil-covered) chestnuts, painted pinecones, and acorns complemented the handmade paper ornaments, which rounded out many a tree’s decorations.

In Woodstock, turn-of- the-century businesses advertised their wares for Christmas gifts. Most gifts were useful domestic items: fabric, clothing, umbrellas, linens, crockery, and carpet sweepers. Homemade, handcrafted items including fancy mittens, satin bows, and stockings filled with candies, nuts, and raisins were among the most common gifts given on Christmas Day.

Highlights of the Holiday Season

December 3 & 4:

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Making Christmas silhouettes & poppers; candle dipping.

Woodstock’s Wassail Celebration:

December 9, 10, & 11, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Making historic Christmas ornaments and pomanders; candle dipping. Sunday, Dec. 11: Horse-drawn sleigh or wagon rides from 10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

December 17 – 18: 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Making Christmas silhouettes & poppers; candle dipping.

December 24:

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Making Christmas silhouettes & poppers; candle dipping.

Closed Christmas Day – Merry Christmas!

Christmas Week:

December 26 – January 1, 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Horse-drawn sleigh or wagon rides, if conditions permit: 10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Making historic Christmas pomanders, ornaments, or snowflakes; candle dipping.

For information: 802-457-2355 or www.billingsfarm.org.