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Marti DelNevo of Williston, Vermont

Marti started quilting over 30 years ago when she wanted to make a quilt for her older son who she was expecting at the time. She became a prolific quilt maker around 2003 when she was able to travel less for work and her two sons were growing up.

After retiring from a 39 year career at IBM as a programmer and project manager, she found her dream job working at Yankee Pride Quilts in Essex Junction. She loves helping people select fabric and work through design questions they may have. After having volunteered for many years, Marti joined the Vermont Quilt Festival board as the Contest chair. She is now the chair of Vermont Quilt Festival. Marti loves that she is able to devote so much more time to quilting.

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Nola Forbes of St. Johnsbury, Vermont

Nola has enjoyed a career as an educator of mathematics and computer programming. The inherent attention to detail, pattern identification and problem solving extend into her avocations.

Practical geometry is practiced as an avid quilt maker. She is a 40-year member of the Kirby Quilters; past President of Green Mountain Quilters Guild; volunteer and former Trustee for the annual Vermont Quilt Festival. She demonstrates traditional and contemporary techniques, teaches and judges for many quilt venues throughout Vermont. She completed interviews for the national Quilters’ Save Our Stories (Q.S.O.S.), an oral history project.

As a seventh generation Vermonter, she also enjoys genealogical research. She is an active member in the Daughters of the American Revolution for the regional Saint John de Crevecoeur Chapter and for the state of Vermont. She has a deep appreciation for the heritage that quilts and their makers have developed.

Nola Forbes

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Froncie Quinn of New London, New Hampshire

I learned quilting by default almost 50 years ago! I was bored and lonely as a new, young elementary school teacher in a town where I knew no one. I walked into a quilt store one day and was amazed at how just pieces of fabric could create such stupendous quilts. That quilt store was Schoolhouse House Quilt Shoppe and the owners were Bob and Judie Rothermel. She was my first quilt teacher when we all worked by hand using templates. The templates were metal and precisely made. LONG story short, I ended up buying the Roy Daniel Template business and began my own business called Hoopla. 

Various moves from Ohio to New York to Vermont and now New Hampshire have provided me with quite a collection of quilt experiences. Not only have I vended at quilt shows all over the country, but also teach hand quilting workshops and have an array of lectures I have created.  

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Upon moving to Vermont, I approached the Shelburne Museum about writing patterns for their quilts and, to my surprise, they took me up on it! As a result, I was given the opportunity to be the pattern writer of Enduring Grace, Quilts from the Shelburne Museum Collection. I also had the fun of being on Alex Andersons’ HGTV show, Simply Quilts, as a result. That launched my career in an entirely different direction. I gave up the template portion of the business and now work entirely with various museums writing historic quilt patterns. I am your eyes to quilts you may never see and work diligently to bring as accurate a reproduction of the quilt as I can. I include a great deal of historical research for each pattern. My mission is that of education as much as giving instructions on making the quilt. My current project is creating the pattern for The Major Ringgold Quilt from the Shelburne Museum. 

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