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Marti DelNevo of Williston, Vermont

Marti started quilting over 30 years ago when she wanted to make a quilt for her older son who she was expecting at the time. She became a prolific quilt maker around 2003 when she was able to travel less for work and her two sons were growing up.

After retiring from a 39 year career at IBM as a programmer and project manager, she found her dream job working at Yankee Pride Quilts in Essex Junction. She loves helping people select fabric and work through design questions they may have. After having volunteered for many years, Marti joined the Vermont Quilt Festival board as the Contest chair. She is now the chair of Vermont Quilt Festival. Marti loves that she is able to devote so much more time to quilting.

Marti Thumbnail 3

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Colleen O'Neill

Colleen O’Neill, of Cornish, NH

Colleen has been a quilter since 1985, when her first niece and goddaughter was born. She has been sewing since age 7 when her mother allowed her to use the family Singer sewing machine.

She owned her own long-arm quilting business, the Cornish Quilt Studio, from 2001-2006.
She was a board member of the Vermont Quilt Festival from 2011-2015. She was a past president of the Northern Lights Quilt Guild in Lebanon, NH, the NH State Quilters Association, and the Green Mountain Quilters. She is currently a member of the Northern Lights Quilt Guild and the Cornish Quilters. She is also co-chair of the Cornish Fair Quilt Dept.

Colleen loves to sew and enjoys teaching quilt classes. She has made over 500 cloth masks for family and friends so far this year. She celebrates all quilters and reminds us all to sign and date our quilts.

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Nola Forbes of St. Johnsbury, Vermont

Nola has enjoyed a career as an educator of mathematics and computer programming. The inherent attention to detail, pattern identification and problem solving extend into her avocations.

Practical geometry is practiced as an avid quilt maker. She is a 40-year member of the Kirby Quilters; past President of Green Mountain Quilters Guild; volunteer and former Trustee for the annual Vermont Quilt Festival. She demonstrates traditional and contemporary techniques, teaches and judges for many quilt venues throughout Vermont. She completed interviews for the national Quilters’ Save Our Stories (Q.S.O.S.), an oral history project.

As a seventh generation Vermonter, she also enjoys genealogical research. She is an active member in the Daughters of the American Revolution for the regional Saint John de Crevecoeur Chapter and for the state of Vermont. She has a deep appreciation for the heritage that quilts and their makers have developed.

Nola Forbes

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